WideCells Group


Stem Cells

We are operating in a very exciting industry; one of the fastest growing segments of the healthcare ecosystem. The cord blood banking industry, alone, is worth approximately £2 billion and is expected to be worth more than £3.5 billion in 2020, according to the most recent industry reports. And even so, we are still at the dawn of the stem cell industry's true potential. The industry has moved from the research and technology stage to a commercial reality, and is on the verge of exploding into the mainstream.

WideCells Group had developed a sustainable business model that has been built by cord blood and stem cell experts, and serial entrepreneurs, who are passionate about the future and steadfast in their belief that stem cell treatment should be affordable and accessible to all. Founded on the vision that the use of cord blood stem cells for transplant medical purposes will drive one of the next important phases in medicine, we are developing market leading products in complementary strategic areas, designed to take advantage of substantial market opportunities.

Stem cell treatments

Since the first stem cell transplant occurred more than 50 years ago (1957), there has been a very significant increase in stem cell transplants. While bone marrow stem cells are the most commonly recognised type of stem cell used in transplant, cord blood stem cells (which are similarly haematopoietic stem cells or HSCs) are increasingly showing advantages over other stem cell sources, including reduced immune reactions and a greater flexibility for tissue-mismatched cord blood units to be used in transplant. Within the past ten years the proportion of cord blood transplants has significantly increased.

Stem cell technology began in the 1950s with the discovery of bone marrow stem cells and the use of these haemapoietic stem cells to treat blood disorders. Through the 1960-70s, bone marrow transplantation was the routine treatment for leukaemia, aplastic anaemia and related blood disorders. Most of these bone marrow transplants were allogeneic with donor cells coming from unrelated donors who donated their bone marrow to treat others. Bone marrow transplantation ideally requires a 100% tissue type match between donor and recipient in order to avoid the risk of graft-versus-host disease (GVHD) in the recipient which is a potentially fatal consequence of bone marrow transplantation.

As a result many patients were unable to find a suitable bone marrow donor and these patients often died whilst waiting for a donor. The extraction and long-term storage of cord blood can potentially alleviate this issue, particularly within families, by making available a source of stem cells with advantageous properties. Further, significant research and ongoing clinical trials are directed at the use of autologous cord blood stem cells, for example in the treatment of cerebral palsy. Currently stem cells are typically transplanted for patients with certain disorders of the blood or bone marrow, such as leukaemia and multiple myeloma, and have been utilised in treating over 80 different diseases, including sickle cell anaemia and thalassemia.

WideCells Group had developed a sustainable business model that has been built by cord blood and stem cell experts, and serial entrepreneurs, who are passionate about the future and steadfast in their belief that stem cell treatment should be affordable and accessible to all. Founded on the vision that the use of cord blood stem cells for transplant medical purposes will drive one of the next important phases in medicine, we are developing market leading products in complementary strategic areas, designed to take advantage of substantial market opportunities.